YOUR GUIDE TO CONTRACEPTION WITH

Available now from all wholesalers.

Slinda is a contraceptive pill that is used to prevent pregnancy. It contains the active ingredient drospirenone.1

Each blister of Slinda contains 24 white tablets that contain drospirenone (also called active tablets) and 4 green tablets that do not contain the active ingredient (also called placebo tablets). The two differently coloured tablets are arranged in the order that they are designed to be taken.1

How does Slinda work?1-3

The active ingredient in Slinda, drospirenone, is a female sex hormone that stops you becoming pregnant in multiple ways, including:

  1. Preventing ovulation (release of an egg from your ovaries)
  2. Thinning the endometrium (the lining of the uterus), to provide unfavourable conditions for implantation
  3. Thickening the mucous lining the cervix, making it more difficult for sperm to enter

 

How effective is Slinda at preventing pregnancy?1,2

Slinda provides high contraceptive efficacy, similar to other common oral contraceptives available. When used correctly, Slinda is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy.

HOW TO TAKE SLINDA1

Each blister of Slinda contains 24 white active tablets and 4 green placebo tablets.

HELPING YOU KEEP TRACK1

To help you keep track, stickers, each with the 7 days of the week are provided in the pack.

Choose the sticker that starts with the day you begin taking the tablets and place it on the blister, so that the first day is above the tablet marked “START”. There will be a day indicated above every tablet, so you can easily see whether you have taken a certain pill on a particular day of the week.

STARTING SLINDA

How and when you should start Slinda depends on whether you are starting after a natural cycle, or switching from another hormonal contraceptive method.


If you have not used a hormonal contraceptive in the previous month1

If you are starting Slinda after a natural cycle, begin on the first day of your period. When doing so, you are immediately protected against pregnancy and you do not need to use extra protective measures such as a condom.

If you start Slinda on days 2 to 5 of your period, you must use extra protective measures such as a condom until you have taken 7 white active tablets.


After switching from a combined pill, vaginal ring or transdermal patch1

After switching from another progestogen-only pill (POP)1

You may switch any day from another POP and start taking Slinda the next day. Additional contraceptive precautions are not necessary.


After switching from a progestogen-only-injection or implant or from a progestogen-releasing intrauterine system (IUS)1

You should start Slinda the day when the next injection is due or on the day that your implant or your IUS is removed. Additional contraceptive precautions are not necessary.


After having a baby1

You can start Slinda any day between day 21 to 28 after having your baby. If you start later than day 28, but before the menstruation has returned, you must be sure you are not pregnant and you must use a barrier method such as a condom until you have completed the first 7 days of tablet-taking.

Instructions for a missed pill if more than 24 hours has passed1

Roll over the packet to reveal the advice for missing a pill during your cycle.
Days 1–7 of your cycle
Take the missed pill as soon as you remember, even if it means taking two pills at the same time. Continue taking pills as normal and use additional contraception for 7 days.
Days 8–17 of your cycle
Take the missed pill as soon as you remember, even if it means taking two pills at the same time. Continue taking pills as normal.
• If you have taken your pills correctly in the previous 7 days, no additional contraception is required.
• If you have missed more than one pill in the last 7 days, use additional contraception* until you have taken 7 days of uninterrupted white active pills.
Days 18–24 of your cycle
Finish taking the white pills as normal, then skip the green pills and immediately start the white pills in the next pack.
• If you have taken your pills correctly in the previous 7 days, no additional contraception is required.
• If you have missed more than one pill in the last 7 days, use additional contraception* until you have taken 7 days of uninterrupted white pills.
Days 25–28 of your cycle
The last 4 green tablets in the 4th row of the strip are the placebo tablets. If you forget one of these tablets, this has no effect on the reliability of Slinda. Throw away the forgotten placebo tablet.

Vomiting and severe diarrhoea1

If you vomit or have severe diarrhoea, there is a risk that the active substance in the pill will not be fully absorbed by your body, the situation is almost the same as forgetting a tablet. In these cases, an additional method of contraception may be needed, and you should ask your doctor for advice.

Are there any side effects with Slinda?1,2

Most women can take Slinda without side effects. If you do experience any side effects, most of them are minor and temporary. However, some side effects may need medical attention. Less serious side effects may include changes in your reproductive system (e.g. changes in bleeding patterns), difficulty thinking or working (e.g. due to headache or fatigue), and changes to the skin or hair (e.g. rash, acne). Others may show up in blood tests. Speak to your doctor if you have any side effects and they worry you.

Please ensure you read the Slinda Consumer Medicine Information here for a full list of possible side effects. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you notice anything else that may be making you feel unwell.


Can anyone take Slinda?1,2

Most women can safely take Slinda.

Slinda can’t be taken if you have certain medical conditions. These include, but are not limited to: an allergy to any of the ingredients in Slinda, including lactose; a blood clot in the legs, lungs or other organs; liver disease; kidney failure; certain types of cancer that are sensitive to sex-steroids; and unexplained vaginal bleeding.

Do not take Slinda if you are pregnant or you think you might be pregnant.

Your doctor is fully aware of all of the reasons why a woman should not take Slinda and will have assessed you to see if the medicine is appropriate. If you are unsure whether you should take Slinda, talk to your doctor.


Can you take Slinda while breastfeeding?1,2,6

Slinda can be used safely by breastfeeding mothers, and can be started as early as day 1 following delivery. No effects on breastfed newborns or infants are anticipated.


Can you take Slinda with other medicines?1

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines, including any medicines, vitamins or supplements that you buy without a prescription from your pharmacy, supermarket or health food shop.

Some medicines may interfere with Slinda and affect how it works. Slinda may also influence the effect of other medicines, causing either an increase or decrease in effect.

Your doctor will know what medicines you need to be careful with or avoid while taking Slinda. You can also refer to the Consumer Medicine Information available here for a list of medicines that may interact with Slinda.

Your doctor is fully aware of all of the reasons why a woman should not take Slinda and will have assessed you to see if the medicine is appropriate. If you are unsure whether you should take Slinda, talk to your doctor.


Will Slinda affect your bleeding patterns?1,2,4

As with all contraceptive pills, Slinda may cause changes in your bleeding patterns, including breakthrough bleeding and irregular bleeding. This may require the use of sanitary protection, or may only occur as light spotting. You may also have no bleeding at all.

If you experience breakthrough or irregular bleeding while taking Slinda, you should continue to take your tablets as normal, without interruption. In general, bleeding with Slinda decreases the longer you continue taking it.

Over time, most women find that they bleed for a shorter time and not as heavily while taking Slinda. In fact, after 12 months of use, nearly half of women have no bleeding at all.


If you have no period or bleeding, are you pregnant?1,4

If you are taking Slinda correctly and have not had any vomiting or diarrhoea, it is unlikely that you are pregnant. One in 10 women report no period or bleeding during the first cycle of Slinda. By 12 months, nearly half of women experience no period or bleeding. If you are concerned, you should talk to your doctor.


How does Slinda compare with other common contraceptive pills?1,5-7

The contraceptive pill most commonly used by Australian women is called the combined oral contraceptive pill, which contains two hormones: an estrogen and a progestogen. While combined oral contraceptives are very effective with correct use, they may not be appropriate for women with some common conditions, like migraines, obesity and women with risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Combined oral contraceptives are also not suitable until 6 weeks postpartum for breastfeeding mothers.

Slinda is a different type of oral contraceptive that only contains one hormone – the progestogen called drospirenone. This means it doesn’t contain any estrogen hormone. With similar contraceptive effectiveness to combined oral contraceptives, Slinda can be used by women who do not tolerate or are not suitable for estrogen containing pills.


Will Slinda make you gain weight?2,6,7

Most women can take Slinda without gaining weight. In clinical studies, Slinda had a neutral effect on body weight.


Is there a risk of blood clots with Slinda?1,2,6,7

While there may be a slightly increased risk of blood clots with progestogen-only pills, there were no reports of blood clots with Slinda in clinical studies. In fact, Slinda can be safely used in women who have a family history of blood clots (e.g. in a sibling or parent), and in women who have risk factors for blood clots (e.g. with increasing age, obesity, high blood pressure, smoking).


Will Slinda affect your future fertility?6

Progestogen-only pills like Slinda are easily reversible. If you wish to become pregnant, simply stop taking Slinda.

References: 1. Slinda® (drospirenone) Consumer Medicine Information. 2. Slinda® (drospirenone) Product Information, accessed July 2021. 3. Regidor PA. Oncotarget 2018;9(77):34628–38. 4. Exceltis Data on File. Clinical Study 301. 5. Stewart M & Black K. Aust Prescr 2015;38(1):6–11. 6. Family Planning New South Wales, Family Planning Victoria and True Relationships and Reproductive Health. Contraception: An Australian Clinical Practice Handbook, 4th edition. Ashfield NSW, 2016. 7. Palacios S et al. Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care 2020;25(3):221-27.

Slinda® is a registered trademark of Chemo Research S.L. Besins Healthcare Australia Pty Ltd. ABN 68 164 882 062. Suite 3, Level 2, Tower 1, 495 Victoria Ave, Chatswood, NSW 2067. Office phone (02) 9904 7473. For medical information call 1800 BESINS (237 467).
www.besins-healthcare.com.au SLI0049 Aug 2021.